About Us

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This is our little piece of paradise! Just look at that view from the top of the hill. We can see far and wide from there. Come join us in making this a sustainable resource based community for all who will be living here. We will be utilizing permaculture principles and designs. This approach guides us to mimic the patterns and relationships we can find in nature and can be applied to all aspects of human habitation, from agriculture to ecological building, from appropriate technology to education and even economics.

By adopting the ethics and applying these principles in our daily life we can make the transition from being dependent consumers to becoming responsible producers. This journey builds skills and resilience at home and in our local communities that will help us prepare for an uncertain future with less available energy.

Our elevation is about 6500′ so we are not in the arid bottom desert floor. They have a varied weather pattern up there. Over the entire year, the most common forms of precipitation are thunderstorms, light rain, and light snow.
Thunderstorms are the most severe precipitation observed during 43% of those days with precipitation. They are most likely around August 7, when it is observed during 38% of all days.
Light rain is the most severe precipitation observed during 27% of those days with precipitation. It is most likely around July 20, when it is observed during 13% of all days.
Light snow is the most severe precipitation observed during 16% of those days with precipitation. It is most likely around January 2, when it is observed during 12% of all days.

The warm season lasts from May 23 to September 12 with an average daily high temperature above 83°F. The
hottest day of the year is July 10, with an average high of 92°F and low of 63°F.
The cold season lasts from November 23 to February 23 with an average daily high temperature below 56°F.
The coldest day of the year is December 26, with an average low of 20°F and high of 47°F.

The principle aquifer in the area is the Coconino Sandstone Formation, which should yield sufficient quantities of acceptable quality water for domestic use but occurs at depth. Available information indicates that the top of the Coconino lies approximately 200′ to 1000′ below land surface under confined conditions depending on location and elevation.

The overlying shallow Bidahochi aquifer at an underlying depth of 55′ to 550′ below land surface is a better source of water if located. This aquifer has collected rain water for 10 million years and has filtered down while flowing to the Coconino, until settling on rock or clay where it remains. There are also underground streams in the area as well.